Not So Tiny Anymore: Hillsboro to Grow by 108 Acres

Loudoun supervisors are on track to triple the size of Hillsboro.

The county will go through a voluntary boundary line adjustment with, adding more than 108 acres to the north, south, and east to the incorporated limits of the 56-acre town. Mayor Roger Vance has said the change would help make the town more walkable, and would help the town compete for needed infrastructure grants. It would also consolidate several properties that are only partly inside the town, although their owners consider themselves Hillsboro residents.

Vice Mayor Belle Ware told the Board of Supervisors she has 10 acres bounded by stone walls and dating back to before 1900.

The map shows the proposed new boundaries for the Town of Hillsboro. If approved, the expansion will add 108 acres to the town’s existing 60 acres. [Loudoun County Office of Mapping and Geographic Information]
The map shows the proposed new boundaries for the Town of Hillsboro. If approved, the expansion will add 108 acres to the town’s existing 60 acres.
[Loudoun County Office of Mapping and Geographic Information]
“Somehow, through the years, I get two tax bills for about three acres and six acres, and it would be very convenient for the county to send me one,” she said.

Among other properties, the expansion will bring the Hillsboro Charter Academy, the Old Stone School, and the Hillsboro United Methodist Church into the town.

Some Hillsboro parcels were split between the county and town in 2003 when the town and county discovered that their maps of the town’s boundaries were based on inaccurate maps created in Richmond in the 1940s or 1950s. The town’s 1976 charter dictates that its boundaries must match the limits described in late 19th century deed books, and restoring the town’s boundaries to match those deeds removed some parcels from the town and split others in two.

The boundary line adjustment will help the town apply for a Transportation Alternatives Grant for a pedestrian and bicycle pathway, and a water system extension grant. The county has put $5.3 million toward reconstructing Rt. 9 in town with sidewalks, on-street parking, roundabouts on each side of town, and underground power lines; the transportation grant would provide additional funding.

The county has also put about $3.145 million toward replacing the town’s water system and constructing a centralized wastewater system. The water extension grant would provide additional money for those projects.

The expansion is not expected to greatly increase residential development in the town, which is limited by the town’s zoning ordinance, existing conservation easements and environmental impacts, and the capacity of the town’s planned water system.

The Board of Supervisors forwarded the decision to October 20.

“The reason I’m not suspending the rules tonight is because we actually need to give more time for the county and the town to provide formal written notices to all of the property owners in the area,” said Supervisor Tony R. Buffington Jr. (R-Blue Ridge), indicating he intends to approve the boundary line adjustment.

Once complete, the boundary change will remove Hillsboro’s long-held status as the smallest town in Loudoun and among the smallest in Virginia. At 164 acres, Hillsboro would surpass Round Hill, which covers about 130 acres, and close in on Hamilton, which has 190 acres.

rgreene@loudounnow.com
@RenssGreene

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