Loudoun Detectives Investigate Double Homicide

The Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office is investigating an apparent double homicide at a home in the Aldie area.

The agency was alerted to the case Wednesday by a call from co-worker of one of the victims, Mala Manwani, 65, who had not been at work this week.

Deputies checked the Tomey Court  home and found Manwani and her son, Rishi Manwani, 32, dead inside. Found in separate parts of the house, both had multiple gunshot wounds, according to the report.

The case does not appear to be a random act and there is no indication of any threat to the public, the agency stated. Further details will be released as they become available.

Anyone with information about the case is asked to contact Detective Perry at 703-777-0475.

5 thoughts on “Loudoun Detectives Investigate Double Homicide

  • 2018-02-01 at 12:16 pm
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    The Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence graded the laws of Virginia D.

    Among highly developed countries in the United States ONLY is the most common murder weapon a gun and murder’s rate highest—by far—FIVE TIMES murder’s rate on Great Britain and in Germany not because in the United States attacks are five times more frequent but because in the United States in attacks more often someone DIES.

    Guns are more deadly than other weapons.

    The FBI reported that in 2016 in aggravated assaults—attacks where victims survived—in one of four only were the assailants wielding guns. In murder—attacks where victims perish—in THREE OF FOUR (73%) assailants were wielding guns.

    In their reports of murder by gun to the FBI where police include the type of a gun, they are reporting a HANDGUN in NINE OF TEN.

    That handguns are a threat to public safety is not news. As introduced to Congress in 1935 the National Firearms Act (NFA) provided for stringent restriction of access to not only machine guns but also handguns—and for the same reason, ease of concealment, long guns with short barrels such as a “sawed-off shotgun.”

    Very unfortunate for public safety in the United States, before passage Congress amended the NFA, exempting handguns—leading to death from gunshot wounds of hundreds of thousands in murder and suicide.

    Where hunters have over a million long guns but hardly anyone a handgun—Great Britain—in their fiscal 2015 in murder twenty-one only died from gunshot wounds. In 2016 in the United States in murder 11,004 died from gunshot wounds—thirty a day. On Great Britain an entire YEAR of murder by gun was LESS than a mere day of murder by gun in the United States.

    Too many Americans and their Republican Party insist on poor public safety in the United States in a policy of access to loaded handguns for every man—every SOB, every man who beats up women, every fool, every man out of his mind—bringing upon innocent persons sudden and undeserved death.

    • 2018-02-01 at 3:45 pm
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      If everyone was armed, we wouldn’t have sitting ducks. People would think twice before shooting.

      We also have this little issue called the Constitution with its pesky amendments. You know, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, the right to bear arms, all that jazz. Mr. McKeon, when will you seating the Constitutional Convention?

      • 2018-02-01 at 5:46 pm
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        Before the English Civil War England had no standing army in peacetime.

        Instead each county organized a militia. In time of war the king would commission aristocrats—commissioned officers—to raise from their local subjects elements for an army. At the war’s conclusion the army disbanded as every man returned to his peacetime occupation.

        In England and its colonies hostility to a standing army in peacetime was widespread:

        A recital of grievances against deposed king James in the preamble of the English Bill of Rights (1689) includes a complaint against James for “raising and keeping a standing army within this kingdom in time of peace without consent of Parliament.”

        In section 13 the Virginia Declaration of Rights (1776) proclaims that “a well-regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained to arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defense of a free state; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided as dangerous to liberty [emphasis added]; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.” Much the same are words in section 30 of the first article of today’s constitution of North Carolina.

        The Second Amendment’s intent was to preserve a practice in England’s colonies—later states—of Euro-American men organizing themselves into militias against the possibility a new national government might do away with the militias in favor of a standing army in peacetime; but militias have fallen into disuse. Today no state requires any man to get a gun and report for training in a militia. Instead—as for well over a century—the national government maintains a standing army, as does nearly every other modern nation.

        December 16, 1991, during PBS’s MacNeil/Lehrer News Hour, before a national television audience retired Chief Justice of the Supreme Court Warren Burger said, “If I were writing the Bill of Rights now there wouldn’t be any such thing as the Second Amendment . . . . This has been the subject of one of the greatest pieces of fraud, I repeat the word ‘fraud,’ on the American public by special interest groups that I have ever seen in my lifetime” (Uviller & Merkel, 2002, p.13).

        Reader loco wonders is an American half-wit behind poor public safety in the United States.

        References

        English Bill of Rights. (1689). Retrieved from http://avalon.law.yale.edu/17th_century/england.asp

        North Carolina Constitution [Article I]. Retrieved from http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/Legislation/constitution/article1.html

        Uviller, H. R. & Merkel, W. G. (2002). The militia and the right to arms, or, how the Second Amendment fell silent. Durham NC: Duke University Press.

        Virginia Declaration of Rights. (1776). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia_Declaration_of_Rights#Text

    • 2018-02-01 at 7:39 pm
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      While your post certainly is not without merit, Mr. McKeon, Great Britain has a very different demographic than the United States.

  • 2018-02-02 at 5:31 pm
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    Loco, When they resort to calling you names, you know you put a JDAM right on target.

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