From the Archives: Loudoun, Slavery and Three Brave Men

Harry was in a terrible situation: it was 1828 and Harry was an enslaved man in Loudoun County, rented by his owner to Samuel Cox. Because Harry was chattel (personal property), he had no recognized surname, as was common among slaves in Loudoun before 1860. On learning that his owner, a “Miss Allison” of Stafford County, was planning to sell him to slave traders who would take him further south, Harry decided to escape.

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History Lesson: The Unison-Bloomfield School

One hundred years ago, Loudoun was a predominantly agricultural county whose people lived in small towns and villages. In most of those locations, life revolved around their schools. In western Loudoun in 1916, a modern, and quite impressive, two-story, eight-room schoolhouse was built at the highest point on Bloomfield Road. It was situated about halfway between the villages of Unison and Bloomfield so that children from both places could walk to school.

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Why Is Preserving Our Rural Landscape So Important—and So Difficult?

A special experience for Loudoun’s residents and neighbors is provided by the ambiance of many historic villages and the physical beauty of the surrounding 250,000 wooded and rural acres—the large majority of the county’s land area. In recent University of Virginia surveys, Loudoun’s residents named our rural landscape as a thing they love most about our county, and residents said the same thing in recent Envision Loudoun community meetings.

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